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In the 1800s, Anglos migrated illegally into Texas, which was then part of Mexico, in greater and greater numbers and gradually drove the tejanos (native Texans of Mexican descent) from their lands, committing all manner of atrocities against them. Their illegal invasion forced Mexico to fight a war to keep its Texas territory. The Battle of the Alamo, in which the Mexican forces vanquished the whites, became, for the whites, the symbol for the cowardly and villainous character of the Mexicans. It became (and still is) a symbol that legitimized the white imperialist takeover. With the capture of Santa Anna in 1836, Texas became a republic. Tejanos lost their land and, overnight, became the foreigners. 
Gloria Anzaldúa | Borderlands/La Frontera

In the 1800s, Anglos migrated illegally into Texas, which was then part of Mexico, in greater and greater numbers and gradually drove the tejanos (native Texans of Mexican descent) from their lands, committing all manner of atrocities against them. Their illegal invasion forced Mexico to fight a war to keep its Texas territory. The Battle of the Alamo, in which the Mexican forces vanquished the whites, became, for the whites, the symbol for the cowardly and villainous character of the Mexicans. It became (and still is) a symbol that legitimized the white imperialist takeover. With the capture of Santa Anna in 1836, Texas became a republic. Tejanos lost their land and, overnight, became the foreigners. 

Gloria Anzaldúa | Borderlands/La Frontera

1,850 notes    reblog   
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marshmallowmegamama:

awomansplaceisinthestruggle:

Nicaraguan guerrinna sister breast feeding her baby during the Contra War. Orlando Valenzuela’s photography captures the femininity of revolutionary Sandinista women so beautifully.
“I have learned that a woman can be a fighter, a freedom fighter, a political activist, and that she can fall in love and be loved. She can be married, have children, be a mother. Revolution must mean life also; every aspect of life.” Leila Khaled

i mean—i love this picture. i really do. it calls to mind the other picture of a woman breast feeding her baby talking to hugo chavez. but…i’ve seen it reblogged so so so many times these past few days—and some poeple have a legitimate right to, as they are latina and this is their history or they’re women of color and i trust that they reblog this critically or aware of context— and other people …i don’t know. this picture coupled with the other pictures of women (mostly women from the global south or carribean islands that i’ve seen) in soldadera gear with guns and in formations…
i’ve been thinking a lot about this poem and wondering in what world we think that being a mami during war time is beautiful or inspiring. :
By Jo Carrillo
Our white sisters radical friends love to own pictures of us sitting at a factory machine wielding a machete in our bright bandanas holding brown yellow black red children reading books from literacy campaigns holding machine guns bayonets bombs knives Our white sisters radical friends should think again.
Our white sisters radical friends love to own pictures of us walking to the fields in the hot sun with straw hat on head if brown bandana if black in bright embroidered shirts holding brown yellow black red children reading books from literacy campaigns smiling. Our white sisters should think again. No one smiles at the beginning of a day spent digging for souvenir chunks of uranium of cleaning up after our white sisters radical friends.
And when our white sisters radical friends see us in the flesh not as a picture they own, they are not quite sure if they like us as much. We’re not as happy as we look on their wall.
“And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You,” published in This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, 2nd ed., 1983

marshmallowmegamama:

awomansplaceisinthestruggle:

Nicaraguan guerrinna sister breast feeding her baby during the Contra War. Orlando Valenzuela’s photography captures the femininity of revolutionary Sandinista women so beautifully.

“I have learned that a woman can be a fighter, a freedom fighter, a political activist, and that she can fall in love and be loved. She can be married, have children, be a mother. Revolution must mean life also; every aspect of life.” Leila Khaled

i mean—i love this picture. i really do. it calls to mind the other picture of a woman breast feeding her baby talking to hugo chavez. but…i’ve seen it reblogged so so so many times these past few days—and some poeple have a legitimate right to, as they are latina and this is their history or they’re women of color and i trust that they reblog this critically or aware of context— and other people …i don’t know. this picture coupled with the other pictures of women (mostly women from the global south or carribean islands that i’ve seen) in soldadera gear with guns and in formations…

i’ve been thinking a lot about this poem and wondering in what world we think that being a mami during war time is beautiful or inspiring. :

By Jo Carrillo

Our white sisters
radical friends
love to own pictures of us
sitting at a factory machine
wielding a machete
in our bright bandanas
holding brown yellow black red children
reading books from literacy campaigns
holding machine guns bayonets bombs knives
Our white sisters
radical friends
should think
again.

Our white sisters
radical friends
love to own pictures of us
walking to the fields in the hot sun
with straw hat on head if brown
bandana if black
in bright embroidered shirts
holding brown yellow black red children
reading books from literacy campaigns
smiling.
Our white sisters
should think again.
No one smiles
at the beginning of a day spent
digging for souvenir chunks of uranium
of cleaning up after
our white sisters
radical friends.

And when our white sisters
radical friends see us
in the flesh
not as a picture they own,
they are not quite sure
if
they like us as much.
We’re not as happy as we look
on
their
wall.

“And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You,” published in This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, 2nd ed., 1983

(via lebanesepoppyseed)

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Thanks to cheersapplespears, cityofroses91, une-dilettante, and thehelldididothis for answering my question. I asked myself that at around 7 am, and it was because I had just seen Y tu mamá también, directed by Mexican filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón. Since I run a movie blog and usually tag filmmakers of color, I wasn’t quite sure about to tag him like that, after all, he’s a white man. 

After getting some sleep and being a little bit more awake, I could give the question more thought and came to the conclusion that even though he’s Mexican and may face discrimination for his nationality, he doesn’t have to deal with racism towards his skin color.

If you agree or disagree feel free to tell me about it, I’d like to hear anyone’s thoughts on this.

2 notes    reblog   

I’m not really sure about this, but when talking about latin@s, should I refer to them as PoC even though they’re white?

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Things you should know about México

Things you should know about México

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Un video en el que se afirma que unos 50 indígenas tarahumaras se arrojaron de una barranca tras no poder conseguir alimentos para ellos y sus hijos, movilizó a usuarios de las redes sociales para iniciar colectas de ayuda en varias partes del país.

Esta información, dada a conocer por Ramón Gardea, integrante del Frente Organizado de Campesinos Indígenas y secretario del Ayuntamiento de Carichí, forma parte de una serie de notas y reportajes que se han publicado a nivel nacional sobre la hambruna que se vive en la Sierra Tarahumara a causa del frío y la sequía.

Desde el 26 de noviembre del año pasado, El Diario dio a conocer que la falta de alimentos empezó a generar problemas de salud importantes en la Tarahumara, ya que de septiembre a noviembre se habían presentado 40 casos de desnutrición, de los cuales 15 son severos, cinco de ellos graves.

El periódico La Jornada dio a conocer, que con base a las actas de defunción, al menos seis personas han muerto de hambre en Napuchi, Wisarorare, Baquiachi y Pasigochi.

“El médico legista puso como causa de muerte la desnutrición que enfrentan pobladores de esa región –sin comida suficiente hasta por cuatro meses consecutivos– como consecuencia de la sequía”, dice la nota de La Jornada.

28 notes    reblog   
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buying-silence:

Chiapas indians at the Agua Azul by B℮n on Flickr.
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montsezu:

jayjacobo:

When the Mexican Revolution came, they were there to say presente…

adelitas 

montsezu:

jayjacobo:

When the Mexican Revolution came, they were there to say presente…

adelitas 

(via fuckyeahmexico)

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fuckyeahpuertoricanqueens:

The Doll House in “Viva la Cuba”
Zaira Marie Huston, Tayra Dior, Casandra ‘La Cubana’(Zahara Montier), April Carrion, Queen Bee Ho’, Angelina Bee & Rochelle Mon’Cheri 

fuckyeahpuertoricanqueens:

The Doll House in “Viva la Cuba”

Zaira Marie Huston, Tayra Dior, Casandra ‘La Cubana’(Zahara Montier), April Carrion, Queen Bee Ho’, Angelina Bee & Rochelle Mon’Cheri 

(via yospeakespanol)

colorfuldiaspora:

Afro-Mexican children.

colorfuldiaspora:

Afro-Mexican children.

(via bad-dominicana)

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"How many lead roles have Latinas played? How often do hit movies feature Latinas in strong roles, as opposed to roles such as maids, gangsters, and other stereotypical roles? I can bet that Latinas play maid roles more often than not, because other roles are not offered to them. It’s always gotten under my skin that practically every time I see a Latina on television she is a maid, prostitute, waitress or other stereotypical role."
- Latina Fatale (via newwavefeminism)

         Tags: race gender stereotypes latina

240 notes    reblog   
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