01
09 14

truc-machin-bidule:

Step 1: Comment on a woman’s attractiveness on every single occasion in every single venue no matter how irrelevant it is. Build up a dating culture entirely dependent on a female’s beauty. Teach children that only attractive women will ever get anywhere in life, will ever be praised, will ever find love and have a family, will ever have a chance at happiness, are worth knowing, are worth being.

Step 2: Mock women for caring about how they look. Call them shallow.

Make fun of those who want or ask for any attention.

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

mybodypeaceofmind:

LOL YES YES YES.

mybodypeaceofmind:

LOL YES YES YES.

(via sanityscraps)

11
23 12
"A woman’s beauty is supposed to be her grand project and constant insecurity. We’re meant to shellac our lips with five different glosses, but always think we’re fat. Beauty is Zeno’s paradox. We should endlessly strive for it, but it’s not socially acceptable to admit we’re there. We can’t perceive it in ourselves. It belongs to the guy screaming “nice tits.”"
- Molly Crabapple, “The World of a Professional Naked Girl” (via delacroix)

(via i-gloriana)

11
18 12
ambientclouds:

Self Portrait - Rosa Rolanda

ambientclouds:

Self Portrait - Rosa Rolanda

22 notes    reblog   
09
04 12
stophatingyourbody:

So, I decided, just for fun, I would take a picture of myself and photoshop it, like they do in magazines. 
It was an interesting process, I showed the after picture to my sister and she said she didn’t see much of a difference, but to me, it looked drastically different, and not necessarily in a good way.  I’m not sure if that’s reflecting on my photoshop skills, or on my personal body image.
 I struggled with my body image for a while, I didn’t like this or that about myself, but recently, I’ve started to accept, and even love the way I look.  I like my messy hair, I like the dark circles beneath my eyes, everything.  Now, I can happily say that I’m just right as I am.
BE BRAVE! JOIN THE BODY PEACE REVOLUTION!

stophatingyourbody:

So, I decided, just for fun, I would take a picture of myself and photoshop it, like they do in magazines. 

It was an interesting process, I showed the after picture to my sister and she said she didn’t see much of a difference, but to me, it looked drastically different, and not necessarily in a good way.  I’m not sure if that’s reflecting on my photoshop skills, or on my personal body image.

 I struggled with my body image for a while, I didn’t like this or that about myself, but recently, I’ve started to accept, and even love the way I look.  I like my messy hair, I like the dark circles beneath my eyes, everything.  Now, I can happily say that I’m just right as I am.

BE BRAVE! JOIN THE BODY PEACE REVOLUTION!

77 notes    reblog   
08
31 12
forbrowngirls:

Iman Proved That Black Women Do Indeed Buy Liquid Foundation
BY CHARLOTTE COWLES [NYMAG.COM]

Iman started her own cosmetics line for women of color at J.C. Penney in 1994, and the brand’s sales skyrocketed to $25 million in just two years. In 2004, she signed a deal with Procter & Gamble to take her brand to the mass market, but it hasn’t been an easy path. “I didn’t understand that it was if they have 1,000 doors, 200 are for women of color,” said Iman at WWD’s Beauty CEO Summit yesterday. Distributors like Walgreens and Target responded to her products with caution and tried to place them at the back of their stores. Said Iman:
It was a no-go. They wanted me to be placed at the back, which they considered, like it is, for the ethnic section, which I was totally against it for no other reason but ’cause also I never considered myself an ethnic brand.
Ultimately, most of Iman’s business is now conducted online, since retailers wouldn’t agree to put her products with the rest of their makeup. Of course, having an e-commerce-based sales model for cosmetics really stunts Iman’s growth, because women usually like to look at makeup — and test it themselves — before they buy it. She knows this and wishes it could be different.
There is growth right here, if only the retailers understood it. I have customers from all over the world that look for the products, but I also have customers in the U.S. that can’t find the product in a store near them.
Further proving that she knows her customers best, she launched a liquid foundation last year, despite discouragement from retailers who thought no one would buy it.
Last year, I decided to create a liquid foundation, which I have been told numerous times by the retailers, “Oh, black women don’t buy liquid foundation,” right?
Um, do black women have skin? And zits and wrinkles and other cosmetic annoyances? Within three months, Iman says, the liquid foundation became her top-selling item. Moral of the story: Retailers, put makeup for black women in your makeup aisle. It’s ridiculous that this is an issue today.

forbrowngirls:

Iman Proved That Black Women Do Indeed Buy Liquid Foundation

Iman started her own cosmetics line for women of color at J.C. Penney in 1994, and the brand’s sales skyrocketed to $25 million in just two years. In 2004, she signed a deal with Procter & Gamble to take her brand to the mass market, but it hasn’t been an easy path. “I didn’t understand that it was if they have 1,000 doors, 200 are for women of color,” said Iman at WWD’s Beauty CEO Summit yesterday. Distributors like Walgreens and Target responded to her products with caution and tried to place them at the back of their stores. Said Iman:

It was a no-go. They wanted me to be placed at the back, which they considered, like it is, for the ethnic section, which I was totally against it for no other reason but ’cause also I never considered myself an ethnic brand.

Ultimately, most of Iman’s business is now conducted online, since retailers wouldn’t agree to put her products with the rest of their makeup. Of course, having an e-commerce-based sales model for cosmetics really stunts Iman’s growth, because women usually like to look at makeup — and test it themselves — before they buy it. She knows this and wishes it could be different.

There is growth right here, if only the retailers understood it. I have customers from all over the world that look for the products, but I also have customers in the U.S. that can’t find the product in a store near them.

Further proving that she knows her customers best, she launched a liquid foundation last year, despite discouragement from retailers who thought no one would buy it.

Last year, I decided to create a liquid foundation, which I have been told numerous times by the retailers, “Oh, black women don’t buy liquid foundation,” right?

Um, do black women have skin? And zits and wrinkles and other cosmetic annoyances? Within three months, Iman says, the liquid foundation became her top-selling item. Moral of the story: Retailers, put makeup for black women in your makeup aisle. It’s ridiculous that this is an issue today.

(via ghostflo)

08
17 12
pangeasgarden:

“i often find myself in awe of how much variety there is to the feminine form and how it can all be beautiful in some way… and while i appreciate the typical standards of beauty that we see in western society, very few women are beautiful in that way. i hope to see the day when everyone embraces the beauty that is theirs.”– an excerpt from CHD:WCK’s Artist StatementYou can see more from CHD:WCK! at http://chdwck.com/
CHD:WCK… beauty of the real

pangeasgarden:

“i often find myself in awe of how much variety there is to the feminine form and how it can all be beautiful in some way… and while i appreciate the typical standards of beauty that we see in western society, very few women are beautiful in that way. i hope to see the day when everyone embraces the beauty that is theirs.”
– an excerpt from CHD:WCK’s Artist Statement
You can see more from CHD:WCK! at http://chdwck.com/

CHD:WCK… beauty of the real
897 notes    reblog   
05
31 12

fsufeminist:

sonic-hip-attack:

babyslothsandpuppysizedelephants:

barbreyryswells:

nahintho:

sapphrikah:

fuckyeahhardfemme:

khymeira:

Hey Quee!

Look,
look.

I fixed her. I’m sure it was just an honest tonality mistake.  They couldn’t have possibly been trying to wash her out.

Right?

fucking hell man!! the fucking difference! racists gonna whitewash 

I’m so tired of this shit.

She’s so not-give-a-fuck, I’m waiting for her to say something about this shit. Call a motherfucker out, Rihanna!

yes. my first thought when i saw these was damn she’s hot but why so white?

i can’t.

according to media i’m not light enough

I really, really wish feminists included this phenomenon more in their discussions about how the media affects girls’ body image. :/

holy SHIT. That’s shameful. 

wtf she looks so much better when she’s not white washed to death. jeez.

(via fsufeministalumna)

05
16 12

(via aradira)

05
12 12

my-soulwhispers-memories:

1. But you eat!

Of course they do. They have to or they would die, very quickly. It doesn’t matter if you saw your friend eating a chocolate bar two weeks ago, or they eat something at lunch every day: they can still have a serious problem. They might calorie count, purge, only eat ‘safe’ foods, restrict what they eat: but they will still eat something, sometimes.

2. But you have a great figure! (especially when said to an underweight person)

Society has managed to twist everybody’s eyes to the point where underweight or ill looks normal or desirable. If somebody ever says ‘I’m Xlbs underweight’ and you reply with this, that’s telling them ‘there’s nothing wrong with you’. We hear it as ‘if you gain anymore, you’ll lose that figure and be fat’.

  3. But you aren’t thin?

     Eating disordered patients are not always underweight. A diagnosis of anorexia has a weight requirement at the moment, yes- but being 5lbs underweight isn’t always obvious. Unless somebody is very underweight, it can be difficult to tell. That isn’t even the point- severity is not the same as weight. A person can be very ill with an eating disorder and be normal or overweight. Not to mention that actually telling a sufferer that they aren’t thin is often heard as ‘you’re fat’. Plain and simple.

4. Just eat [X] and avoid [Y] and you’ll be fine.

This tends to be the ‘just eat a healthy diet and you won’t get fat!’ type thing. It’s more than a diet. It’s not like a sufferer can just ‘snap out of it’. Advising a healthy eating routine is sweet, but it’s a little like showing a person with cleanliness based OCD a light cleaning routine. The second part gets its whole own entry-

5. Avoid [Y].

On stories about treatment, people are always asking ‘well why are they feeding them pizza and things? Can’t they have grilled fish and vegetables? It’s healthier!’ It’s healthier in that it has may have nutrients, sure. But you’re mixing up ‘good for weight loss’ with ‘healthy’, as many people do. Low calorie foods are hard to gain weight on- not to mention that learning to eat all foods is very important in recovery. If I somehow managed to gain weight on lean meat and salads but couldn’t consider chips without a breakdown, I wouldn’t be recovered or healthy.

6. Just snap out of it!

If we could do this, none of us would have a problem.

7. Let me tell you about my diet-

Not only is this boring (sorry, it’s true), it’s very triggering. If you enthuse about how you feel sooo much better and happier and you’ve lost 8lbs since you cut out bread, I’m going to think about the toast I ate this morning and feel like crying. You may be in a very different place from me- you might genuinely need to lose some weight. But I’m not in a place where I can make that distinction right now: if you talk about how you never eat carbs, I’ll think ‘clearly I don’t need to either’- which isn’t true.

8. Wow, you ate a lot at that meal! Well done!

I’ve heard this used to mean ‘you tried hard, well done’. It’s a sweet sentiment, but all I hear from that sentence is ‘wow, you ate a lot’. And I tend to hear ‘a lot’ as ‘too much’.

9. Why don’t you just go out for a run if you feel fat?

I’ve had this advised as a way to deal with the food I’m eating. You can see the logic- anxious over being unhealthy/overeating could be answered with healthy activities like exercise. But exercising whenever you eat is unhealthy. It’s very unhealthy. Doing actions purely to burn off calories is purging, and that’s not a habit any of us need.

10. Oh, I had a friend with an eating disorder! Yeah, she got down to XXlbs and was in hospital for months, it was awful, she didn’t eat for days on end…

We’re competitive. We shouldn’t be; but we are. If you stand there and tell me about how thin your friend was, I think ‘well, she was really sick. I’m nothing like that, I can’t be sick!’ I feel ashamed and upset and- yes, jealous because she did it better than me. If you’ve come to identify yourself purely as your weight and your disorder, as many people do, hearing this is like hearing ‘you aren’t good enough’.

http://recoveringinspirings.blogspot.com/2011/12/10-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-eating.html

(via sexeducationforyoureverydaylive)

4,387 notes    reblog   
05
06 12
baldblackbeauties:

I am really trying to pursue plus size modeling so this is just one of many that will go into my portfolio :)

baldblackbeauties:

I am really trying to pursue plus size modeling so this is just one of many that will go into my portfolio :)

(via hairy-stargate-lesbian)

04
18 12

someotherchick:

i just really like her everything 

*  ~  *

(via strugglingtobeheard)

04
09 12
ryeisenberg:

khealywu:

joestanton:

newsweek:

Ashley Judd, writing on the site, fights back at those in the media who speculated on her “puffy” appearance, calling the frenzy a misogynistic assault on all women.Why even stoop to their level?
Ashley:

I choose to address it because the conversation was pointedly nasty, gendered, and misogynistic and embodies what all girls and women in our culture, to a greater or lesser degree, endure every day, in ways both outrageous and subtle. The assault on our body image, the hypersexualization of girls and women and subsequent degradation of our sexuality as we walk through the decades, and the general incessant objectification is what this conversation allegedly about my face is really about.

And she’s only getting started! Yea girl. Read Ashley Judd Slaps Media on The Daily Beast.

DANG ASHLEY JUDD KILL IT

This is fucking amazing. I love you (even more) Ashley Judd.

YA BURNT, MEDIA. 

ryeisenberg:

khealywu:

joestanton:

newsweek:

Ashley Judd, writing on the site, fights back at those in the media who speculated on her “puffy” appearance, calling the frenzy a misogynistic assault on all women.Why even stoop to their level?

Ashley:

I choose to address it because the conversation was pointedly nasty, gendered, and misogynistic and embodies what all girls and women in our culture, to a greater or lesser degree, endure every day, in ways both outrageous and subtle. The assault on our body image, the hypersexualization of girls and women and subsequent degradation of our sexuality as we walk through the decades, and the general incessant objectification is what this conversation allegedly about my face is really about.

And she’s only getting started! Yea girl. Read Ashley Judd Slaps Media on The Daily Beast.

DANG ASHLEY JUDD KILL IT

This is fucking amazing. I love you (even more) Ashley Judd.

YA BURNT, MEDIA. 

(via irawrforwar-deactivated20121227)

         Tags: ashley judd celebs feminism beauty

02
15 12
84 notes    reblog   
10
03 11
montsezu:

jayjacobo:

When the Mexican Revolution came, they were there to say presente…

adelitas 

montsezu:

jayjacobo:

When the Mexican Revolution came, they were there to say presente…

adelitas 

(via fuckyeahmexico)

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